Angerville, Population 1

Within the five stages of grief I am currently at anger, and most likely will be here for some time. How I know is I am usually an angry person. It’s a fact that I don’t know how to show any other emotion. I have surmised it is because I get this feeling that by showing it, in place of sadness or confusion, I don’t look “weak.” I guess that’s the only time I am quintessential male.

I was never taught from my parents that any emotion is unacceptable. On the contrary, my mother fostered the idea that all emotions are welcomed and should be released. My father never gave any inclination that any of my feelings were not valid. So, this concept wherein I refuse to look “weak” is kind of bizarre, all things considered.

Generally, I am just angry about everything. There is no specific topic that draws my ire. It’s anything. Part of me wishes I didn’t feel that way, but the other half doesn’t want it to dissipate. In my aggressive feelings I receive a weird sense of control, while being nowhere near it.

I will say, the one thing that does have me upset, is my husband getting a second opinion. While I was initially on-board (and still am) I have become increasingly concerned that we are wasting our time. Unlike my husband’s family, I do not believe the doctor is incorrect in his ALS diagnosis. I wish it was just a vitamin deficiency, but I have accepted that it isn’t. In doing so, I have picked my pony on where we should go to next, and for me that’s treatment, not in following this foolish path to a fantasy land that is merely a side route to the ultimate destination.

There is no cure for ALS. There are only scientific elixirs that delay the inevitable. The sooner you get on them, the more likely to slow it’s progression. The decent into it brings about paralysis and the inability to breathe and swallow. I am uncertain if speaking is in there (I have stopped researching because I can’t deal with the gravity of his illness) but I imagine it is. Not being able to go to him for advice is going to cut me the most. I go to him for his vast knowledge and because he knows better than anyone how to soothe “the beast.”

The hardest part is I can’t share these feelings. I feel like I am burden to him or making it worse. I don’t want to bog down the time he has with my inability to cope. He’s doing miraculously, or at least pretending better than I. For being a somewhat trained actor, I am a horrible one in real life.

I want the doctor to be wrong, but life is clearly not about giving people what they want. Example, this wouldn’t be happening at all. He could have been like all the other people who’ve had the weight-loss surgery and gone about living his life as normal. Nope… he gets to have his ability to do normal tasks taken from him. (It should be noted that there is no scientific evidence that one lead to the other, it just appears that way from an outsider’s perspective.)

I just hope we’re not wasting time. In the end it can go either way, really. Either he starts the treatments and then we find out it’s just the deficiency, or he waits and the diagnosis is reconfirmed. Whichever it ends up being, the process in getting additional review is agonizingly slow against a disease that isn’t about taking it’s time.

Grief Fragments

I really don’t know what to write. I know I should. I want to. But for the life of me, I am such a bundle of emotions, I can barely string together a coherent, pensive thought. Instead they’re fragments of grief.

It’s almost been a week since I found out my husband is dying/going to die. And it has been quite the emotional roller-coaster. The moments where I glide along an even track are my favorites, because it’s then that I can readjust and get my bearings. Although even then, I will barely have had any time and something will plunge me into a spiral. And it can honestly be anything. (Songs, I’ve discovered, are the worst.)

We have since spoken with the doctors handling his diagnosis and they seemed optimistic, in regards to treatment. (Or at least I took it as optimistic, even though the diagnosis is terminal.) The primary doctor or attending (whatever it is) was pretty certain he has ALS. I guess they went with motor neurone disease because it’s too soon to make a concrete diagnosis, and MND is kind of an umbrella, with other bizarre things beneath.

In regards to time… Well, even he said from the start that’s a loaded question. He said from his experience with the disease that it averages 4-5 years. Which, is good, and shitty. It all depends on the person and each one is different. The primary physician suggested doing clinical trials for treatments, and my husband definitely wants to (because he wants this to have meant something.) The resident also suggested a secondary treatment that would involve my husband getting shots three times a week, and would include a permanent port in his body for injection. I thought the hubs would say no to that but he was on-board. The doctor said this “infusion” typically adds about 1/3 to the time.

For whatever reason, I have a number of years stuck in my head. I only think of it because between the two of us, there is usually a 12 or 7 between us. And with the husband it’s always 7. However, I understand that’s just a grieving spouse clinging to hope. I should know, more than anyone at this point, that nothing is ever certain.

Cancer Kills Humor

My aunt is dying. There is no other way to put it and for herself or her children to keep trying is… I cannot think of the appropriate word.  I don’t mean to appear callous or cruel, because I don’t want her to die just as much as they, but I have accepted that in her case the possibility of recovery is next to none.

She has thyroid cancer.  Apparently it is the kind that is the fastest growing and most deadly, and unfortunately occurs primarily in men. It would appear that time is telling her that it is time to go. The two doctors she has seen have flat-out denied her treatment, because of where its at and how large it is they don’t want to take on the risk of operating on her and have her die. (Granted she’s going to die anyway…) The lie she told my mother was that she just needed to have radiation to shrink it and they would operate.  Whether she intended to deceive my mother has yet to be seen.

Before I knew all of this, and was aware that the doctor had suspected it to be cancer, my mother asked me to send my aunt, my mother’s best friend, a get well card because she could use something to perk her up. What I did instead was piss her and her daughter off.

I thought my card was humorous, it joked that “a bible verse would be good right about now, too bad you have a heathen for a nephew” and I thought my personal message was spontaneous and off-the-cuff funny. However, it was not received in the manner I intended it to be taken. For me saying “I may not pray, but…” I might as well have said “Fuck you, I hope you die” because that was the response I got.

Since then her daughter has unfriended me on Facebook, which means any hope for an apology from me has absolutely dissipated.

I know when I’m at fault.  Hell, I blame myself for everything eventually. That is why I have an addictive personality.  I always feel that I am a mistake, not that I just make them.  So I will eventually come to the conclusion I need to apologize. BUT if you unfriend me on Facebook that is guaranteeing I will say nothing of the sort. My pride on the matter is petty and ridiculous, I know that. It is the conscious effort that goes into the action where I find umbrage.

So, I sent another card to my aunt to apologize.  This time however it was a religious card that said NOTHING about prayer (amazing, I know), because in fact I do not pray and felt any mention of it would add insult to injury. I apologized and told her that there have been only 3 women in my life that helped shape me to be the person I am today: my mother, grandmother, and her. Fingers crossed she won’t see it as me mocking her faith or telling her she deserves to have cancer. Who knows in this wacky world.

The reality of the situation is everyone handles crisis and grief differently and we need to be patient with the ones when something in the vein of my situation occurs. The thing I find humorous is that it was the cousin that unfriended me who said exactly that many years ago.